Archive for June, 2013

Prescriptions That Aren’t Right for High Index

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 28, 2013

High index lenses are great, but they’re not for everybody. Prescriptions That Aren’t Right for High Index It’s generally true that high index lenses are going to be thinner, lighter, and better than standard plastic or polycarbonate lenses, but sometimes they’re not right for you. For instance, if you’re getting prescription safety glasses or prescription […]

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When Your Prescription is “High Enough” to Consider High Index Lenses

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 25, 2013

High index lenses are some of the highest quality lenses you can order. They are appropriate for most prescriptions, depending on what you want out of your lenses, but there are some prescriptions that simply don’t warrant high index. “High Enough” to Consider High Index Lenses If you can see well without glasses, for instance, […]

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Lens Materials and Scratch Resistance

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 22, 2013

High index lenses have several qualities that set them apart from other lens materials. Lens Materials and Scratch Resistance Their index of refraction, or their ability to bend light efficiently, is due to their density compared to “standard” lens materials. They are lighter, thinner, and more advanced than standard lens materials. They also have some […]

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What Are High Index Lenses Made Of?

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 19, 2013

High index lenses can be made of a variety of plastic and glass materials. What Are High Index Lenses Made Of? High index plastic is a plastic material that is denser than standard plastic or polycarbonate. High index glass is similar in that it’s made of a glass material that is denser than crown glass. […]

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High Index Lenses with Prism

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 16, 2013

Like most lens materials, high index lenses can be made with prism and, as would be expected, the lenses are thinner than standard lens materials. High Index Lenses with Prism There are positives and negatives to getting high index lenses with prism correction. The pluses are the lenses’ thinness, lightness, and looks. The downsides are […]

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Are There Any Advantages to “Low Index” Lenses over High Index?

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 13, 2013

When most of us think about high index lenses, we automatically assume that they’re better than the “standard” or “low index” lenses at the eye doctor’s office. Advantages of Low Index over High Index Lenses These standard lenses, though, are sold to a large portion of eyeglasses wearers worldwide, and they’re worn in all sorts […]

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Reflections, Density, and Index

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 10, 2013

The high index of a lens is connected to most of the qualities worth considering when shopping for a lens material. Reflections, Density, and Index Index of refraction, Abbe number (and optical clarity), amount of glare, thinness, weight, scratch resistance, and overall aesthetics are all tied to the lens’s index. If you are shopping for […]

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High Index Plastic Lenses: Abbe Number and Color Aberration

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 7, 2013

Abbe number is a very important and often-overlooked lens quality that is particularly relevant for high index plastic lenses. Abbe Number and Color Aberration A general rule of thumb when it comes to lens materials is the higher the index, the denser the lens. As lenses become denser and more efficient at bending light (which […]

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High Index Plastic Vs. High Index Glass Lenses

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 5, 2013

People who have heard of high index glass and high index plastic lens materials may wonder which is better for them. High Index Plastic Vs. High Index Glass Lenses Each material has its strengths and its weaknesses, and what may be right for one person will not be right for everybody. If you are deciding […]

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Double Convex and Double Concave High Index Lenses

  • Kieran Hunt
  • June 2, 2013

High index lenses are intended to help make your lenses thinner, and double concave and double convex high index lenses are designed to make your lenses even thinner still. Most lenses are made using a “lens blank” with a set curvature on the front, which is generally either convex or flat. Double Convex and Double […]

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